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What a Rep Wants; What A Photographer NeedsWritten by Jennifer...

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What a Rep Wants; What A Photographer Needs

Written by Jennifer Perlmutter

It is the ultimate catch-22 in the photography industry: a photographer wants/needs a rep but does not have the client base to attract one. At the same time, the photographer cannot get said client base without a rep.

Why is this the case?

It is my belief that the saturation of the marketplace has presented an imbalance to the once level playing field.

Reps want and need successful talent while buyers often want vetted talent since they are typically trusted with large sums of money and their clients’ creative needs.

Where is the balance?

Many reps are still willing to work with photographers who they believe in IF they are getting the bites but not necessarily landing the projects. This tells the rep there IS existing interest and that they can push that curiosity further with your existing nibblers and their personal client base. This perfectly illustrates a rep’s first WANT: a working photographer or one with significant interest.

What does this mean for the photographer in terms of what they NEED from this situation?

Photographers need to partner with someone they trust has their best interest in mind. Someone who will not only go after an existing client list, but who is able to identify new avenues for your work. If you aren’t getting the nibbles, make sure to keep your targeted marketing efforts up!

Let’s focus on the word PARTNERSHIP for a moment. Reps WANT a photographer who will be their partner in promotion. The only way a rep can continue reaching out on your behalf is if you are consistently providing them with new work to share with creatives and buyers. You need to perpetually be prolific. Be the Madonna of photography and change and adapt with the times. Keep up your portfolios, social media, networking…these are all attractive opportunities to a rep.

What do you NEED from this arrangement?

You need a rep who is going to give you direction and feedback. Someone who can meet with buyers and glean insights as to what you are missing in your portfolio or what would make it stronger. If you have a great portfolio, a kicka** personality, and a buttoned up production, then you need to be guided and challenged to be prolific in ways that will further assist in selling your work. At the end of the day reps and photographers want to make money and create great imagery.

Reps WANT a photographer with passion and drive.

Ideally, an artist who is supporting their own outreach and not just relying on the rep to go out there and do all of the work. Reps can speak on your behalf but at the end of the day YOU are the artist. You are the person creatives want to meet. You are the person creatives will be on set with. You are the one bringing their ideas to life. Reps wear many hats. One hat is to sell, another is to negotiate and close. Their last is to manage your career. All of those things combined keep a rep very busy.

So what do you NEED from this?

You need a roster you believe in; a mission you believe in. You need a person or people you believe in to handle your career with honesty and integrity. You need someone willing to share information so you have the ability to navigate this ever-changing landscape. You need someone flexible who is willing to compromise on terms (as they are different for every rep). You need someone as excited about your career as you are.

What a rep WANTS and what a photographer NEEDS is simple:

Partnership. Trust. Passion.

Brands on The MoveSeptember 2015We’re back with  the latest news...

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Brands on The Move

September 2015

We’re back with  the latest news brands on the move in the ad agency world. Here’s what this month in BOTM looks like!

Heather Elder Supports FreelancersA few months ago, an art...

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Heather Elder Supports Freelancers

A few months ago, an art producer friend called to ask if I knew of any freelancers looking for work. I did, so I shared their names with him. A few days later, someone else called and asked the same question, but for a different city. The following week, another person. In the span of a week, I was asked three times if I knew of any freelance art producers.

By the third call, I realized there was a real need for a central website for freelance art producers to showcase their work and share their contact information with other producers looking to hire them.

So, I created one. It is called FreelanceArtProducer.com.

Why did you start FreelanceArtProducer.com?

When we first started our blog, Notes from a Rep’s Journal the idea was simple; to start meaningful conversations with people in our community about important issues in our industry.

We wanted to create a space that our entire community could discuss what was on their mind but as well as share with each other all the things that make our jobs special. So many of us do not have a team of people to answer our questions so we need to rely on each other. The blog was designed to provide a place for all of us to share resources and information and start conversations on a bigger platform. Drafting off of this, along with Brite Productions, we co-founded The Community Table. These are round table events hosted around the country with industry leaders talking about the most relevant and current issues. The conversations are then posted on our blogs in their entirety, with the idea that there is nothing more powerful in our industry than education.

We care very deeply about community and for the past five years, our blog and the Community Table have allowed us to foster that in a unique and relevant way. So, FreelanceArtProducer was an obvious next step for us. What better way to connect a group of people in our industry than to help them make meaningful connections among themselves?

Why aren’t you charging for this site?

The site is not much more work than our current blog and to charge for it did not seem in keeping with the sense of community we want to foster. If someday it gets popular enough and the upkeep is such that we need to hire someone else to handle it, then we might consider charging but for now it is free to join and free to use. 

What do you get out of it?

First and foremost, we are filling a need in our industry and we like that. It fits with who we are and have become over the past five years. It is about community and the very idea that we are more powerful together than we are alone. 

Second, while we build this site, we will get to connect with the freelance community in a way that we have not been able to before the site. Because freelance art producers move around so much, they are hard to keep in touch with consistently. If we were more connected with them, we could include them on our blog, invite them to events such as Community Table and other gatherings, and hear what they have to say about issues. In our opinion, they are an underrepresented group in our community. 

Why would I want to be on a site with other freelance producers?

Great question. We understand that the freelance community can be very private. You have your contacts and the regular people who call you. If you promote yourself on a site with other people won’t they be tempted to try someone new? We can see the point, but ask you to think about the power that could come with being part of a community of freelance art producers. Imagine the new opportunities that might come your way if a person who didn’t hear about you via word of mouth, found you on this site? And, imagine how great it would feel to cheer lead for your community some?

And, think about the future. You are a dynamic group of creative and resourceful art producers. We know what you pull off every day. We can only imagine what wrangling you all together will lead to eventually. We suspect even bigger, better and more important things that we haven’t even discovered yet.

How will you promote the site?

We are committed to promoting this site. To do so, we will create a blog post for each member that celebrates something special about them. It may be an interview for the Insider Art Producer series, or it could be something specifically geared toward that art producer. A contributing author to our blog, has already agreed to help create interesting content with the participants.

We believe that so much of what makes being a success in our business is the power of word of mouth. So, we are asking that everyone consider being generous with their social media channels to help promote the site and the blog posts about the art producers. We know it seems odd to think about promoting an art producer other than yourself, but we believe in the power of community and supporting each other and know that it works. This is of course not a requirement, just a hope of ours. 

As well, we have partnered with our friends at FoundFolios and they have offered to share the profiles of a few of the freelancers in their bimonthly newsletter, which is sent out to 80k creatives internationally.

Who do I ask if I have other questions?

Email Heather or call her at her office 415.931.7709. Or, leave a comment on this post. 

How do I sign up?

That’s easy. We can get your profile done right away while you work on gathering any other items you may want to include. Check out this link: Want to be on the site? If you made it this far, thank you! And, if you like the idea, please spread the word by sharing it on social media. 

A Sample of Featured Producers:

Marissa (McCreay) Serritella

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Jenny Taich

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Melanie Tongas

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FoundFolios Acquires ThePhotocloserFoundFolios is excited to...

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FoundFolios Acquires ThePhotocloser

FoundFolios is excited to announce the acquisition of ThePhotocloser and the hiring of founder Frank Meo as the Director of FoundFolios.

By combining ThePhotocloser with the state of the art resources and professional manpower of FoundFolios, we have created a powerful marketing tool. FoundFolios connects with over 200 creatives daily, supports in-bound requests for assignments along with continued email, direct mail and newsletter outreach monthly. FoundFolios is fully engaged in their community through events and have a great creative following through their social media platforms. Partnering up with companies like Lürzer’s Archive and Heather Elder’s Freelance Art Producer - you’re in very good hands.

Frank Meo has over 25 years of experience representing photographers and Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalists; securing them highly valued commercial assignments. He has worked on hundreds of company photo libraries and client campaigns including American Express, Acura Motorsports, U.S. Coast Guard, Xerox, ESPN, Citi, Nike and others. Photographers represented by Frank have worked for major newspapers, magazines and TV stations around the globe.

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Emerging Talent - Sean DuFreneSean can be described as a man...

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Emerging Talent - Sean DuFrene

Sean can be described as a man with a vision. In the words of Photography Consultant, Amanda Sosa Stone, his work can be described as “journalistic with layers of what I call the Sean DuFrene angle of reality skewed”. Growing up in Huntington Beach, CA,  DuFrene had plenty of experiences to fuel his imagination, allowing his quirky side to play out in his photography. It’s important to Sean that his imagination and enthusiasm blends to create thought-provoking imagery.

How would you describe your style? 

My images are bold and quirky with a strong narrative. My specialties include conceptual, portraiture and lifestyle photography.

How did you start shooting? 

Early in my career I worked as a photojournalist for the newspaper, The San Diego U-T as well as other newspaper outlets. After that, I studied at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, CA. This effort earned me a Masters of Fine Art degree in photography. As a gesture of gratitude for all of my hard work, Google personally dedicated a few pages to me.

Who has inspired your style?

Guy Bourdin, Helmut Newton, Steven Klein, Chris Buck.

Any recent work we should be aware of?

I recently created images for The Surfer’s Journal. The magazine article is due out in March 2016. The story is about Peter “PT” Townend - the first world champion in surfing - and his career. Scott Hulet, Editor and Jeff Divine, Photo Editor, wanted me to give the pictures a treatment similar to an earlier project I created called the “Jack” series

To view more of Sean DuFrene’s work, check out his site and Instagram.

Art Director Inspired: Rob StoryAssociate Creative Director, Rob...

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Art Director Inspired: Rob Story

Associate Creative Director, Rob Story sheds some light on what keeps his creative juices flowing, what keeps him fulfilled and how he’s continuing to master his craft.

Associate Creative Director

Proof Advertising - Austin, Texas

Current Clients: San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau (primary), Columbia College, ERA Realty (as needed).

What inspires you daily?

Art in general. I am a very sick man when it comes to living, breathing, eating, sleeping and collecting art. I would say that I spend about 85% of everyday thinking about paintings, drawings, photographs, doodles, sketches, etc. It’s something that just comes naturally to me and is as necessary to my happiness and well-being as air and water. I come from a long line of artists and art collectors on both sides of my family, so somehow it’s ingrained in my blood.

As a result of my vice, I see A LOT of art on a daily basis. Whether it’s via my never-ending search for 16th-20th century paintings and drawings (for my collection) or by way of my quest for new, young calligraphers, illustrators, street artists and photographers to collaborate with on work projects, I’m looking at art. Art, art, art. Never stops.

As far as the world I work in, though, typography has been a true love since my days as a poster/fanzine artist in high school. Poster artists like Art Chantry, Günther Kieser and Micael Priest and album cover artists like Hipgnosis and Reid Miles were incredible sources of inspiration. Music was (and is still) a big part of my life, so music-related art was what I looked to when I began finding my way as an artist. When I became a professional, I continued to refer to the work of my “music art” heroes, but my universe expanded a bit. What inspired me as a young advertising Art Director came in the form of work by editorial Art Directors like Fred Woodward and DJ Stout. One thing I learned pretty quickly was that when budgets are low (or there isn’t any budget at all), type is your savior. It’s free, and if you’re skilled enough, it can become the art. Nobody exhibited this talent for making art out of type better than DJ and Fred. I mention my history because it’s still relevant. The best way to answer the question (what inspires me daily) is to mention these types of designers. I still look to their work, as well as to the newcomers in these genres, for inspiration.

Illustrators old and new are also sources of inspiration. I have always had an incredible amount of respect for the way a great illustrator can describe a concept visually, and how they are able to pull the viewer in and create a compelling argument as to why one should buy a magazine or a book, go see a movie or buy a toy. Of course they are liars. The best in the business. More often than not, the contents of the book or magazine, or the excitement of a movie or toy, isn’t nearly as interesting as the picture on the cover, poster or box promised it would be. But that’s the game. I’ve known it since I was a kid, and I admire it. These days, the world of illustration has become a mish-mash of retouching, photography, and old-fashioned “handcrafted” drawing and painting. But it’s still the same beautiful lie. And when I see the best examples of this craft, I become inspired to be the best liar I can be.

How do you stay inspired?

I do the work. I don’t just “manage” the work. I don’t just “go to meetings about” the work. I do the work. I design. I draw. I concept. I don’t let that knife edge get dull. It’s a funny business, advertising. An art director might climb the ladder of success and then look behind at their skill set (what made them famous) lying in the mud at the bottom of the ladder. Forgotten. We sometimes forget that becoming a creative director (what we all aspire to be, right?), takes us further and further away from what we’re good at. I’ve always felt that I wanted to keep my hands on the wheel and do the work until I simply couldn’t anymore. Through this exercise, I will (theoretically) become better and better and more and more knowledgeable. As an art director, I don’t get better at my craft by going to meetings. Curiosity, exploration and knowledge of what’s going on around me inspire me daily. As far as I see it, that’s the only way I will be fulfilled and master my work.

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Brands on The MoveNovember 2015We’re back with the latest brands...

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Brands on The Move

November 2015

We’re back with the latest brands on the move in the ad agency world. Here’s what this month in BOTM looks like!

An Interview with Lürzer’s Archive’s...

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An Interview with Lürzer’s Archive’s Editor-In-Chief

Michael Weinzetti is Editor-In-Chief at one of the industry’s most coveted magazines. We had the pleasure of speaking with him about advertising trends and who in the world is “killing it” right now.

photo by Carioca

Q: Why do you think Archive is one of our industry’s most coveted magazines?

Archive is very popular with advertising creatives because each issue is a quick way of finding out what great advertising – print and film –looks like. Since the work has been selected from hundreds of submissions – about 7% of the work submitted actually makes it into the magazine – it is assured you get to see the very best. Archive Magazine is a time saver. If you go online and look at the various sites that present current ads, you’ll have to wade through masses of inferior or – at best – mediocre work before you find the really good stuff. With Archive, you just get the best, the kind of work you want to see. This is something that has been proven time and again, when at international ad festivals the winners of Lions, Pencils or whatever the trophies are called, for the most part, have been featured in our magazine long before.

Q:  So what’s the process to submit an ad to Archive?  Does it cost anything?

It’s easy. Log on to our website www.luerzersarchive.com and go to “Submission”; follow the instructions depending whether it’s print work or films. The work you submit must be published, and approved and paid for by a client, which is to say no free or on spec work, is and has always been free of charge. Many years ago we used to run a campaign for creatives to submit their work to our magazine with a headline that summed this up very well: “Show us you’re good for nothing.”

Q:  So once it’s submitted, what’s the process of being selected?

Even after almost 30 years at Archive, I still look at every single print submission myself and then decide whether or not to share it with our readers. To do the same with film submission would take too much time, so our editorial staff in Vienna does an informed pre-selection. As for the digital work featured in Archive, we have a guest judge for every issue – usually a well-known Creative Director from some major digital agency, or the head of an ad agency’s digital department. They then provide us with what he or she thinks are the top 15 digital works at the time.

Q: There has been a decline in American submissions. Why is that?

We have not seen any such thing. It is in fact quite the opposite. We get more American submissions than ever, from agencies all over the US and Canada. The US are almost always among the top three nations contributing to the campaigns featured in each issue of the magazine – print as well as film.

Q: What would you say to advertising creatives wanting to get exposure?

Have a look at the work featured in our magazine and then look at your work. Do you think it could be placed among the campaigns featured in Archive magazine and seen by ad creatives, your peers, all over the world without sticking out like a sore thumb? If yes, what are you waiting for? Go to www.luerzersarchive.com and submit whatever you want to show to the world. It’s never been as easy as it is today.

Q: What’s your favourite “print” advertising trend right now?

Nowadays, clients as well as young creatives are crazy about doing digital/interactive work (which I think may be a passing trend but it’s still very notable at the moment.) Campaigns are very rarely print-led anymore. Which often means a smaller budget for print. This again can mean that creatives have to try harder to come up with interesting ideas. They are no longer able to rely only on execution. To that point, they might have to find cheaper ways of executing these ideas than they did perhaps 20 years ago. This has led to a certain preference of using illustrations instead of photography although the advent of digital imaging has also meant that the lines between the two media have been very much blurred.

Q: Which country is killing it right now? (i.e. doing the best work)

South-American countries for sure and not only just Brazil which, of course, has a long and brilliant tradition of print work that goes back more than 30 years. Their way of doing print had a lot to do with the fact that their advertising had to speak to a large illiterate population. This led to more visual-based ads rather than copy-based ones. With the rise of globalisation this became a preferred method of advertising throughout the world. Clients, especially multi-national ones, wanted their ads to appeal to the largest number of people possible and words had a tendency to get in the way of that.

Q: What would you tell the photographers and illustrators who covet this magazine as well?

If you want to share the work you have done for agencies or perhaps clients direct, make sure that they submit their campaigns to Lürzer’s Archive magazine. Or, submit that work yourself after having checked with the ad agency involved. We do need the whole campaign, not just the illustration or photograph you have created for them (i.e. with headline and logo and all that is part of a proper ad). An exception to this is when you submit for our bi-annual “Special Edition” books on Photography, Digital Imaging or Illustration. Then we’re interested in seeing the original work contributed by you to that campaign. Apart from the special issues, you can submit editorial or even self-promotional work. There is always the possibility of taking out paid ad pages in Lürzer’s Archive. If you do that, you’re bound to reach exactly the target you should be aiming at: Creative Directors, Art Directors and Art Buyers. All those “decision makers” are not only keen on seeing their work featured in our magazine but they’re also interested in finding out what’s hot in advertising right now and what the latest trends are.

The Art of InstagramPhotographer Kevin D. Liles worked with...

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The Art of Instagram

Photographer Kevin D. Liles worked with consultant Jennifer Kilberg and remembers her pushing to be smart about the work you put on Instagram, which can have a huge impact. She mentioned that being part of communities on there was important, and using specific hashtags and tagging brands and other influencers was key. Shortly after Kevin started his own personal marketing campaign, he landed a contract with the Atlanta Falcons to shoot for their social media accounts, namely Instagram.

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Because the Falcons where tagging him in their posts, Kevin’s account started growing pretty steadily (few hundred a week). He was also posting their photos and tagging players and using hashtags.

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A couple of weeks into this, Instagram listed Kevin as a “suggested user” and his account exploded from 1,100 to 80,000 in two weeks.

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Roster Refresh - Homestead CreativesHomestead Creatives is a...

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Roster Refresh - Homestead Creatives

Homestead Creatives is a premier artist agency and production company based in Austin, Texas, founded by Shannon McMillan and Maddie Hamilton. Homestead unites and showcases independent local photographers, designers and advertising creatives on a national level, and one day will be worldwide.

Matt Lief Anderson

Style: Lifestyle landscape, travel, fashion & music

Social Media:

Instagram 

Tumblr 

Flickr 

Notable Clients: Vice, Poler, Pitchfork, Stance, Corona, Huffington Post

Current Projects to watch for: Ignant and Pitchfork 

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Cody Hamilton

Style: Transportation, conceptual lifestyle and still life

Social Media: Instagram, Facebook

Notable Clients: Goodyear, Southwest Airlines, B-cycle, Southern California Association of Governments, TEXpress, Walgreens, Ace, Zales, Travaasa Experiental Resorts, Great Raft Beer, Hops N Grain, Verb Hair Care

Current Projects to watch for: Currently working on personal projects that translate his conceptual style into motion

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Dave Mead

Style: Weird & unusual, conceptual portraits

Social Media: Instagram, Facebook

Notable Clients: AARP, Ace Hardware, Adpeople, Amex, Amplify, Anti Burglary & Theft Prevention Authority, Arnold, AT&T, BMW, Chipotle, Converse, Curves, GMC, Harley-Davidson, HEB, Hewlett-Packard, Hyatt, Krispy Kreme, Nike, Pacifico, Popeye’s, Progressive Insurance, Radio Shack, Rolling Stone, Sony, Southwest Airlines, State Farm, Vans, Yeti

Current Projects to watch for:  Fun Fun Fun Music Festival and directing for San Antonio Tourism

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Buff Strickland

Style: Lifestyle, travel, food, kids, hospitality

Social Media: Instagram, Tumblr

Notable Clients: AARP, American Express Custom Publishing, Bloomberg Magazine, British Airways High Life, Coastal Living, Everyday with Rachel Ray, Food & Wine, Food Network Magazine, Garden & Gun, Good Housekeeping, Gourmet, HGTV, JW Marriot Magazine, Ladies Home Journal, Martha Stewart Ominmedia, Men’s Health, Parents, Real Simple, Redbook, Storey Publishing, The Wall Street Journal, This Old House, Travel + Leisure, Woman’s Day

Current Projects to watch for: Wells Fargo, Merrill Lynch and joint venture with Southern Living and JC Penney


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Andrew Yates

Style: Versatility (yes, that’s a style): Still & Motion - Healthcare, corporate, industrial, technology, documentary

Notable Clients: Southern Comfort, Budweiser, Dell, AT&T, Costa Del Mar, Christus Health

Current Projects to watch for: Cowgirls of Texas and New Mexico

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Brett Stiles

Style: Illustrator

Social Media: Instagram, Flickr

Notable Clients: PetSmart, Nike, AT&T, Pennzoil, Southwest Airlines, Pebble Beach, Livestrong Foundation, Nabisco, American Legacy Foundation, Truth, United States Air Force, Marshalls, Kohler, Lone Star Beer, Firehouse, Interstate Batteries, Vans

Current Projects to watch for: Wine bar restaurant branding package, Family fresh branding package. Providing families with a convenient and affordable way of eating more fresh fruits and veggies everyday. Documentary film titles, 50 state stamps

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Emerging Talent: Taylor Horne“I think my biggest fear as an...

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Emerging Talent: Taylor Horne

“I think my biggest fear as an artist (and when I walk home alone at night) is that people might try to put me in a box.”

Name: Taylor Horne

How would you define your photography style?

A mixture of punk rock grit with a traditional refinery.

How did you start shooting?

I started taking photographs when I was 12 years old. My mother had this camera in the closet and I got her to put some film in it for me. I grew up in rural Pennsylvania so really it all began with landscapes. I tried painting and drawing but I just couldn’t recreate what I saw. When I was 14 I took a class at school where I learned traditional 35mm black and white film photography and darkroom techniques. I really fell in love with the chemistry of photography and the permanence of the medium. I was an angst-filled teen that had trouble really expressing how I was feeling; I turned to art as a way to do so. I loved being able to make people feel something from looking at my work. When I grew up I moved to different cities and eventually ended up in New York City. My parents are Christians and I grew up with that religion being so important in my family. I never believed in any of it. I always had a love for the macabre and esoteric. After I had been living on my own for a while, I was able to feel comfortable accepting that side of myself and was no longer afraid to explore and express it. Since that self discovery I started creating work that people really started to notice and I met other people with the same interests. Now I feel like I am creating what I was originally always afraid to.

Who has inspired your style?

My work is mostly inspired by old occult photographs and paintings. I love Edward Gorey’s illustrations or Tim Burtons drawings. I try to have a literary component to my work and I frequently read and reference the works of Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft. I also have an extensive obsession with 80’s cult horror movies.

You can see more of Taylor’s work visit his site and give him a follow on Instagram

Stefen Chow Photography’s 2015 RecapIt has been a ride.In 2015,...

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Stefen Chow Photography’s 2015 Recap

It has been a ride.

In 2015, Stefen Chow traveled to 17 countries for various assignments. He climbed the Dolomites, photographed at the Hollywood sign, flew over playgrounds across Singapore, and also opened exhibitions in Hong Kong, Paris, Singapore and Beijing. Chow directed two international motion campaigns and had the chance to work with some of the most exciting companies and magazines this year. He spoke at multiple TEDx conferences, and his work is now collected by the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

It has been a ride. Check out this 1 minute video recap he shared with us.

To see more of Stefen’s work, visit his site.

Where Do Buyers Look For Talent? If only I had the answer to...

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Where Do Buyers Look For Talent? 

If only I had the answer to this question, I’d be king.

Truth is, there are so many correct answers to this question it can make your head spin and make you go broke in the process. Buyers, like the rest of us, look everywhere, all the time.  Here are some helpful tips to get you in the right direction without breaking the bank.

Today it’s never been more complicated for photographers to get noticed. The advice I get from Art Buyers is as varied as are the choices of where to spend your marketing dollars. I don’t believe it’s about the amount you spend but rather the placement and follow-up to your numerous efforts that gets you noticed.

This bit of advice is true: if you do nothing, for sure you won’t get noticed.

Dont think… an ad in any single source book or listing on a search engine is the key to success. Social media, a platform with more imagery and verbal bullshit, that even on a good day of tweeting, posting and blogging, you still feel like you got nowhere. One single direct mail – you’re kidding right?  

Heres the key: do a piece of all of the above with consistency. Decipher what your possibilities are and work off your strengths. Avoid the mental block of “this is too big a job for one person”.

Buyers find talent from these sources:

  • Online Sources
  • Rep referrals
  • Email and Direct Mail Promotions
  • Their own bookmarks (how do you get on that list - look above)
  • Meetings & Portfolio Reviews
  • Personal Outreach
  • Social Media (if they have time and see something consistently from the artist)
  • Art Director inspirational finds (“Hey I want this guy for this campaign – how do you get on that list – look above)
  • Magazine Awards – CA, PDN, Archive, etc…

What speaks to you? What feels authentic, budget friendly and realistic to be consistent with?

Great content is a must. Your images must WOW us every time. I suggest you tell us something about your work. Think of engagement as a pillar to your marketing foundation.

Nobody likes to market. My feeling is you better come to grips with this “new reality” because it’s already the old reality. Be targeted and consistent with all your promotional efforts. Determine your audience and focus on the clients that need and understand your vision. Cut the pie narrow and go after the sweet spot.

Create a game plan that you’re comfortable with. However, you better be ready and wiling to get out of your comfort zone.

Another great resource is Rosh Sillars. Check out his blog. He gives you a framework to which you can get your head around this social media quagmire.


This blog post was written by the Director of FoundFolios, Frank Meo.

Roster Refresh: Pinkstaff PhotographersPinkstaff Photographers...

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Roster Refresh: Pinkstaff Photographers

Pinkstaff Photographers is a premier boutique agency based in New York City representing a diverse group of photographers.

Founded by Marsha Pinkstaff the agency is committed to a personalized approach that provides equal support both to the clients and to the photographers. We represent Jim HughesAaron Graubart,  JJ Sulin,  James Michelfelder + Therese Sommerseth, and Francesco Bittichesu in addition to Sasha Gulish and Mark Holthusen introduced below.

INTRODUCING SASHA GULISH

Sasha Gulish is a San Francisco-based photographer who studied documentary photography at UC Berkeley. In 2014, Gulish earned national recognition through a PDN article titled “Sasha Gulish: From a Little of Everything to Lifestyle Advertising”. Inspired by a love for family and a good laugh, her images highlight the small, overlooked moments in everyday life.  Gulish lives in Larkspur, CA with her husband and two photogenic children, Ziggy and Delilah. Currently, Gulish is preparing to launch her new website with rebranding.  

Follow her on Tumblr, Instagram, and Facebook.

Clients include ConAgra, Huggies, Land of Nod, Ogilvy & Mather, Parents Magazine, Razorfish, SC Johnson, Sephora, Similac, ULTA Beauty, YMCA and Young & Rubicam.

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INTRODUCING MARK HOLTHUSEN

Mark Holthusen is a New York-based photographer known for creating complex images that push boundaries. With a career that spans photography, motion, theater and digital innovation, Holthusen’s work contains elegant painterly imagery and graphic animations. Holthusen has been honored by Communication Arts, Graphis, American Photography, and PDN.  Raised in Reno, Nevada, it’s fitting that Holthusen’s past projects include capturing Appalachia’s demolition derbies, Nevada’s brothels, and Oaxaca’s gender-bending muxes. Last month in London he wrapped an opera featuring the Tiger Lillies; this month he shot a spread for Smith & Forge Hard Cider for the 2016 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. He is currently working on a theater production of River Bride for Oregon’s Shakespeare Festival.  

Follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and his blog.

Clients include Adidas, BBDO LA, Carmichael Lynch, CDM, Chick-Fil-A, Honda, Jack’s Links, Kohler, Mekanism, Purina, Smith & Forge, Target, The Richards Group, Toyota and Zeus Jones.

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Stand Out In Front of The Creative CrowdWritten by Peter...

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Stand Out In Front of The Creative Crowd

Written by Peter Berberian, AXS Director of Brand Development

“Definition of Branding: The marketing practice of creating a name, symbol or design that identifies and differentiates a product from other products.

What exactly does "branding” mean? Simply put, your brand is your promise to your customer. It tells them what they can expect from your products and services, and it differentiates your offering from that of your competitors. Your brand is derived from who you are, who you want to be and who people perceive you to be.“Entrepreneur.com

Most photographers think of branding as the design of your logo or type on a website but it goes way beyond that. I sat down with a few of my photo editor friends for a conversation. We not only talked about logos and promos, we talked about the look and feel of the photography. Think about a Terry Richardson image, now think about a Mario Testino photograph. Both fashion, yet extremely different. Different sides of the same coin. You most likely wouldn’t mistake one for the other. 

Guess what? That’s branding.

Libby Petersen, feature editor at Rangefinder Magazine; "few photographers stick in my mind more than Chellise Michael and Mike Busse. They’re a husband and wife team out of Brooklyn and a breath of fresh air, creatively and personally. Always up for collaborating (and they’re absolute aces at communicating and following up), they have this contagious zest for life and curiosity to walk down new, surprising avenues of creativity, playing around with the limits of digital and film. They’ve even established a separate arena called Meet the Michaels for personal work—they’re always feeding it, always trying new things.”

For me, both the personal work and professional work look similar, muted with a limited color palette. Looking and feeling like their brand.

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James Wojick is the photographer in Amy Wolff’s head. He does really off beat stuff like putting his name on tuna cans and having his own oyster farm.

Photographs of the oysters are made into postcards and well, you get the picture. These types of promos make me angry, because they are so good.

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For Deborah Dragon, formerly deputy photo editor of a little magazine called Rolling Stone; Matt Maturin is the artist that sticks with her the most. He reads the story about the subject he is photographing and comes with his own ideas, yet is still open to outside ideas and starting points from the photo editor. Lots of photo illustration guys don’t shoot their own photos, Matt does. Below is this image (I was going to say picture, but it’s far beyond it) of Chuck Palahniuk. Look closely for the fine detail of the illustration. He’s a photographer, illustrator and also combines the two. It’s his eye for detail that makes him rise to the top.

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I asked James Pomerantz, freelance photo editor and photographer, (via email) and this is what he says:

“When I was working for the New Yorker, Emiliano Granado; This one time, with very short notice and a very young baby at home, Emiliano dropped everything, flew to Mexico with an open return date, arranged his own mule and rode into the jungle to wait for a cave explorer to surface.”

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“Another time, Emiliano spent a day documenting New Yorker writer Gary Shteyngart’s day wearing Google Glasses

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“Emiliano went above and beyond to come back with great photos. Both times, and every other, he did it without a single complaint. He plays well with others and is talented both in the studio and on the road. A rarity, he’s capable of producing both extremely heartfelt, emotional work and lighthearted, fun photography too. ”

What James is talking about is the way a photographer presents themselves. A lot of what goes into getting hired is the confidence the artist exudes at the creative meeting. Good work is just as important as you looking and acting like you can complete the job.

Oh yeah, a great logo is pretty good too.

If you want to check out more about me, here is an interview I did with the Photo Brigade podcast. If you get bored, fast forward to the end. I really get going.

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Roster Refresh: E+C CreativeETC Creative represents visionaries...

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Roster Refresh: E+C Creative

ETC Creative represents visionaries in photography, live action, motion animation and music. With offices in New York & Chicago, their artists collaborate with Ad Agencies, Design Firms and Corporations to create solid branding for their clients. Their resources are un-paralleled, their projects are accomplished on-target, within budget and their success is measured on creativity, high-level performance and trust. 

Jordan Lutes

Style: Lifestyle

Notable Clients: Urban Outfitters, Toyota, Lorna Jane Active, Oregon Health & Science University

Social Media: 

Instagram

Facebook

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Harold Julian

Style: Fashion/Lifestyle/Portraiture

Notable Clients: Sparkling Ice feat. Kevin Durant , Foster Grants, FCB Health for Blood Equality, Gin Lane Nyc for Adidas Women, FCB Health for Dysport, Modern Luxury Magazine, Marisol magazine Japan, The Bellevue Collection.

Current Projects to watch for: Blood Equality Campaign

Social Media: 

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

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Dad Time - A Photography ProjectThis project is both a personal...

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Dad Time - A Photography Project

This project is both a personal journey and a professional test kitchen. 

My exploration of fatherhood through portrait, reportage and conceptual imagery – is something I have been building upon for the past couple of years. The project is both a personal journey and a professional test kitchen. The problem solving skills required to work on this long-term project provide new ideas for ways of producing client work and approaching new creative challenges.

I am a stereotype of my generation: a career-driven woman who delayed motherhood until it seemed like she might be able to take a couple weeks of maternity leave without breaking the bank or saying no to some sort of career-changing opportunity. Little did I know that once I made it through the initial shock of adding motherhood to my already full plate, parenting was an unexpected joy that has become a huge source of creative inspiration.

A large part of that inspiration comes from observing the culture of parenting that surrounds me. Moms feel so much pressure to conform to a specific ideology. How long are you breast feeding? Did you have a natural birth? Are you co-sleeping, attachment parenting, making your own organic baby food? Do you plan on home schooling? Are you going to quit your job?

And yet, no one asks these questions of dads.

When we had our second son, and my husband moved more time away from helping run our business and towards caring for our two young children, I started to notice the differences between how moms and dads parent. I learned to understand and appreciate these differences. I was surrounded by boys - I was surrounded by cars, trucks and diggers. My sons did not go on playdates. They started listening to Motörhead.  

On one hand, I like to observe the way men parent: unconcerned with neatly organizing toys or keeping tiny hands out of the guacamole; unwilling to sacrifice a basketball game with his friends; unaffected by inspirational Instagram feeds or Pinterest boards. And on the other hand, I identify with the more traditionally male role as the primary earner for the family.

One image from the Dad Time series, for example, is of a dad juggling two toddlers at his desk – something I often do with my 3 and 4-year-olds in my home office when they are missing me throughout the day. As much as the project is inspiration from dads themselves, I consider many of the scenes to be self-portraiture with the dads as stand-ins for me.

Professionally, this project has been an incredible journey. My clients often want images that feel completely un-posed.  Simultaneously, there is a need to control every aspect of the production – from casting to wardrobe, location to gesture. The more I shoot for myself, the better examples I have of what kind of images I want to make. This gives me the strength to push for my preferred production style, or for the location or talent that I know will provide the best possible outcomes for my clients. That is often the biggest challenge for my commercial shoots – not being able to influence production while trying to deliver my style of imagery. Each personal shoot improves my ability to explain exactly how my photographs are made to a potential client, providing examples of specific lighting and directing approaches that will ultimately help us achieve what they need for their particular brand and story.

Through the Dad Time project, I have also gained a tremendous amount of experience working with kids of all ages. Recently, for example, we walked into a shoot where, within minutes of our arrival, the kids talked about how bored they were. We moved as quickly as we could to light an enormous space, trying to get the shoot done before the kids lost focus entirely. These experiences help me explain the need for extra pre-light time, child wranglers, or particular schedule approaches when clients suggest things that simply will not work well with a specific age group. This project is also just great critical thinking practice: I’m constantly thinking on my feet, and any time spent observing the interaction between parent and child – rather than between models – helps me direct better down the road and know what to be looking for.

To view more of Callie’s work head over to her site, or give her a follow on Instagram.

A New Approach to the Portfolio ReviewI hear from creatives and...

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A New Approach to the Portfolio Review

I hear from creatives and art producers all the time that need to actually see work.  From talent, all they want is to get their work in front of creatives. The stars are aligned! So the question screams; how do we make this happen in the most unobtrusive way for the creatives while at the same time economically realistic to the talent we promote? Certainly not brain surgery. The facts are crystal clear. Creatives need to source new talent all the time because they want a fresh vision to present to clients. Yet, they have virtually no time to review new work.  

We created a format so that the creatives (i.e. the reviewer) could see portfolios and iPads in the least cumbersome way with no photographers present. This format of portfolios only lends itself to being a truly productive and creative experience. A creative can come see 60 to 70 portfolios in the matter of one or two hours and be able to focus on the work that they need and want to see. That was our goal from day one and by any measure, we nailed it!

“I really enjoyed viewing at my own leisure. When artists are not present it allows me to hone in on what I am looking for in a less aggressive way. The quality of the work was excellent. I took pictures of everyone’s names I plan to reach out to.”

Brian Keenan, Art Director, Food Network

Brian brings the point home; it really was about the visual experience in every way. High quality work in a casual setting.

Other feedback I got, first hand (I was there both days ushering the creatives) was “this is really a great setting” and “I don’t have to worry about making chit-chat. I can look at books and come back as often as I want.”

We also had about 15 iPads showing a variety of work that, in most cases, included motion. This too was set up in a way so that a viewer could actually hear and comprehend the intended message.

“The experience of having all of these books and iPads in one room and having the flexibility to go at my own pace was unique.“

Kimberly Stoeker, Senior Art Producer, McGarry Bowen

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photography by Tony Gale

A few reps actually came back three and four times looking at work and searching

for new talent themselves. A nice unforeseen addition to the event was the casual and understated networking that happened. It was very organic, like a Dead concert.

Janice Moses, said it best:

"I appreciate the effort Found put into creating this event. It was great for us to be able to display our work to the Art Producers and Art Directors who attended.”

Janice Moses, Photo Representative

From the very beginning, the photographers loved the idea. How could you not? They didn’t have to travel, no hotels, no time away from studio, meals etc. and the nervousness of personally showing their work was eradicated.

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photography by Tony Gale

The photographer’s main concern was who and how many folks will see my book? So I was able, with certainty, to tell them that with our reach and history within the industry, we’re going to get 30-35 maybe even 40 reviewers. We got 50+ which consisted of Art Producers, Creative Directors and Photo Editors.

Most importantly, not many organizations can pull something like this together and make it successful. That’s why no one else even tries. I’m proud of our staff, the blinding commitment to our talent and our collective reputations within the creative community. That is why this event was such a sterling success.

We are now planning reviews across the country, Boston is up next.

Hoping to see you on the road…

A Successful Promotion: Creatives Reveal Their PreferencesFound...

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A Successful Promotion: Creatives Reveal Their Preferences

Found Director, Frank Meo, sat down with an acclaimed panel of creatives consisting of Artist Representative, Joe Lombardo, Creative and Art Director, Jana Jarosz and Deputy Photo Editor, Raydene Salinas. They talk about many important topics including the best ways for photographers to promote themselves. These pros discuss the process and ways to break through the clutter and see positive results. Why does one promotion work better than another? What type of follow-up works best with an Art Producer and Creative Director? Who should you be targeting with your promotion and how often?

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The Panelists:

Joe Lombardo of ETC CREATIVE is a New York City based representative with 15+ years of experience. He has a diverse background as an agent in both the commercial advertising and fashion worlds. He serves the industry as a photography consultant at the Palm Springs Portfolio reviews, is a frequent panelist for APA NY and has helped curate and promote many artist gallery exhibitions over his tenure. He is a fan of the printed piece and helps in the concept and design not only of his agency promotion but his 11 artists as well.

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Jana Jarosz is perhaps the only Art Director in the Publicis NA creative department who has a Menswear Tailoring Certificate from FIT in New York. Jana is both an inveterate fashion junkie and a “think outside the box” Art Director. Having worked at both a large and small agency throughout her 19 years in the business, Jana has instigated and actualized everything from digital projects to street projects and not outdoor, but indoor for Courvoisier to numerous brand-building solutions for Softsheen-Carson, Garnier and Almay. As a Creative Director at Publicis, Jana has worked with her partner, LaRonda Davis, to author the original Fructis Style work and successfully launch the Effie-Award winning campaign for Dark and Lovely Au Naturale. Beyond advertising, Jana is an active volunteer with Free Arts NYC, an arts-based mentoring program, and with Manhattan Comprehensive Night and Day High School where she coaches night school students through their Regents exams.

Raydene Salinas is currently the Deputy Photo Editor at Time Out New York. Along with being a freelance street style and portrait photographer she is also a certified yoga teacher. She has previously shot for The Huffington Post Style section and her work can be seen in Cosmopolitan Magazine, Time Out New York and The Cut.

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The Moderator:

Frank Meo has been newly named the Director of Found, a subsidiary of Agency Access. Found is an online global search engine that markets and connects photographers to Art Buyers, Editors and clients. For 25 years, Frank has represented photographers that include Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalists and helped them in securing highly valued commercial assignments. He has worked on hundreds of company photo libraries and campaigns for clients such as American Express, Acura Motorsports, U.S. Coast Guard, Xerox, ESPN, Citi, Nike and others. He participates on various panels and workshops; The Eddie Adams Workshop, International Center of Photography (ICP), The Art Directors Club, The One Club for Art & Copy, American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), NY Foto Works and Advertising Photographers of America (APA), PDN Expo and Palm Springs Photo Festival. In 2010, he was a nominator for the prestigious Infinity Awards. He has judged for Lucie Awards, IPA, Foto Week DC Awards, Moscow Photo Awards as well as PDN Photo. Currently he writes a monthly column for Resource Magazine and Pro Photo Daily.

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Emerging Talent - Whitney OttWhitney Ott is a food and still...

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Emerging Talent - Whitney Ott

Whitney Ott is a food and still life photographer. With an eye for detail and composition, she primarily uses natural light to capture the essence and subtle beauty of her subjects in ways that are both simple and unique. She graduated from Mercer University with a minor in photography before moving to Atlanta to further her photographic studies at The Creative Circus. She currently resides in Atlanta, GA, with her husband and their Australian Cattle Dog, Scout.

Name: Whitney Ott

What is your style of photography? 

Food and Still Life 

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How did you start shooting?

My love for cameras and photography started when I was little. My dad let me play with an old Pentax MX camera of his, and I remember that I most enjoyed the sound of the rapid wind lever followed by the the satisfying heavy click of the shutter release button. For my 13th birthday, I received my first film camera and I haven’t stopped shooting since. I started out photographing trees, flowers, and our dogs. Lucky for me, my high school had a dark room and when I was a junior, I had the opportunity to take photography as my art elective. That’s where I learned how to develop my own film and my fate as a photographer was sealed. I minored in photography at college, which is where I really started to hone in on being a still life photographer. After I graduated, I moved to Atlanta to go to The Creative Circus to build my portfolio and fine tune my skill set.

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Who has inspired your style?

Irving Penn’s still life and floral work, Johnny Miller, Jamie Chung, The Voorhees, to name a few.